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PCI is proud to offer the first education management system dedicated to the precast concrete and precast structures industries, the PCI eLearning Center.  All courses offered through this system satisfy the continuing education requirements of engineers in all 50 states!  As an AIA provider, PCI is able to offer architects approved Learning Units to satisfy their continuing education requirements.  Be sure to bookmark us and visit often as we populate this interface with more and more free, easy-to-access, always-available coursework.

 

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Course Categories

Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 4) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  1. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define assumptions for service load conditions
  2. As a result of completing this course participants will be to calculate prestress losses
  3. As a result of completing this course participants will be to account for tension stresses along the top of a beam
  4. As a result of completing this course participants will be to account for tension stresses along the bottom of a beam

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Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 5) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  1. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define "ultimate moment"
  2. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define "nominal moment"
  3. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define design assumptions for ultimate load conditions
  4. As a result of completing this course participants will be to calculate ultimate moment checks

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Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 6) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  1. As a result of completing this course participants will be to locate reinforced concrete design equations in the 2014 release of ACI 318
  2. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define nominal shear strength and live load deflection
  3. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define design assumption for shear strength
  4. As a result of completing this course participants will be to calculate and check shear stresses

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jgr test course Thurs 100115

thurs test jgr long descript

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Georgia Tech - Mix Design Reference Materials

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences.

Learning Objectives:

Part One: Materials

  1. Select raw materials suitable for a specific application
    1. Learn the concept of specific gravity and how its used in mix design
    2. Identify the properties of aggregates that have an affect on concrete mixtures
    3. Learn basic cement chemistry and how it affects concrete properties such as strength and set time
Part Two: Proportioning
  1. Complete the mathematics to proportion a basic mix design
  2. Understand the concept of absolute volume mix designs as per ACI-211
  3. Design a structural precast concrete mixture
  4. Adjust portions of a concrete mix design while maintaining proper yield
Part Three: Durability / SCC
  1. Learn common proportioning and materials considerations for durable concrete
  2. Identify best practices for mitigating Alikali-Silica Reaction and other long-term issues
  3. Design considerations for Self-Consolidating Concrete
  4. How the concept of combined aggregate gradation fits into SCC mix design
Part Four: Architectural / Statistics
  1. Design an architectural precast concrete mixture
  2. Identify best practices for colored and textured concrete
  3. Learn the basic statistical concepts pertaining to concrete mix design identified in ACI 318
  4. Evaluate the standard deviation of a mixture's 28 day strength
Part Five: Trouble Shooting
  1. Troubleshoot plastic concrete issues
  2. Troubleshoot hardened concrete issues
  3. Match solutions to common concrete problems that are identified
  4. Learn best practices for handling chemical admixtures in a precast facility
 
Sessions:
  1. Materials – A discussion of various concrete constituent properties and how they affect the concrete’s performance, and suggestions for selecting materials for different applications.
  2. Proportioning – A walk through of the ACI-211 method of absolute volume mix design, and a session of designing concrete, using a provided worksheet, from historical data. A mix design Excel spreadsheet, designed for this course, will also be provided.
  3. Durability / SCC – A discussion of materials and proportioning considerations for designing durable concrete. This session on Self-Consolidating Concrete moves past the basics and gives practical suggestions on making consistent SCC repeatedly..
  4. Architectural / Statistics – We revisit both materials and proportioning, but this time with a view to concrete aesthetics. Best practices are presented for designing the mix and the sample approval process. Also, this session covers the basic statistical processes needed to evaluate the performance of concrete mixtures.
  5. Trouble Shooting – The concrete we design may exhibit performance issues at times, this session teaches how to identify the cause of several common  problems, and what the solutions are.

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test 456

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Courses coming soon

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PCI eLearning Course T110: Preliminary Precast, Prestressed Concrete Design

Preliminary design is the first step in designing an economical precast, prestressed concrete bridge. This first course in the series on design, presents the preliminary plan, superstructure, substructure, and foundation considerations, and member selection criteria with design aids and examples.
 
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify general considerations for bridge type selection
  • Evaluate alternatives that best illustrate typical challenges faced by engineers, presented by the bridge site and other factors
  • Interpret preliminary design tools to formulate possible design solutions
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PCI eLearning Courses T100: Courses on Design and Fabrication of Precast, Prestressed Concrete Bridge Beams

These courses grew from the need for readily accessible, authoritative educational resources. PCI, with assistance provided by the Federal Highway Administration and in collaboration with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, enlisted a large team of educational course developers, all with practical experience in the design of bridges, many have conducted university research, and most have National Cooperative Highway Research Program development experience. These courses were written by authors who are experts in design. Teams of subject matter experts reviewed and critiqued each course. The courses were then balloted and approved by the PCI Committee on Bridges and the PCI Technical Activities Council. The courses provide the overarching theory, the concise design steps, and information about various issues that will be encountered during design and fabrication of precast, prestressed concrete flexural bridge members.

On the PCI eLearning portal, course participants are able to download reference materials in pdf format to build a library of cited and relevant publications.

At random locations in each course, short quizzes will appear to be sure concepts are being understood. Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and Professional Development Hours (PDHs) are available for compliance with state requirements for registered professional engineers. The credits are accepted in every state. After successful completion of the course, a simple application is all that is required. There is no cost.

more...

Precast Concrete Mix Design Session One

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences. MATERIALS – A discussion of various concrete constituent properties and how they affect the concrete’s performance, and suggestions for selecting materials for different applications. Learning Objectives: 1. Select raw materials suitable for a specific application 2. Learn the concept of specific gravity and how its used in mix design 3. Identify the properties of aggregates that have an affect on concrete mixtures 4. Learn basic cement chemistry and how it affects concrete properties such as strength and set time

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Test Course 2015-10-01

Test uploaded 10/01 to test: 01_Preliminary-Design

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ACI 318-14 Reorganization - Session One

The webinar series will present a review of the reorganization of ACI 318 in the 2014 edition applied to precast/prestressed concrete. The webinar will be presented in three parts. Part 1 will be a review of the organization of the code as a component-based document. Part 2 will cover technical changes made to ACI 318 that have effects on the design of precast/prestressed concrete. Part 3 will cover design examples of a prestressed concrete beam, a precast concrete wall, and a precast concrete column to illustrate the flow through the re-organized code applied to precast concrete components. 
 
Module One
ACI 318-14 Re-Organization: a review of how the ACI code changed in format and general content
 
After attending this session, attendees will be able to:
1.define a component base code
2.identify changes in organization in ACI 318-14 from ACI 318-11
3.reference toolbox chapters of ACI 318-14
4.discuss the design professional use of Chapter 26 of ACI 318-14

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Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 1) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  • As a result of completing this course participants will have an understanding of the benefits of the use of prestressed concrete as a design method and the basic equation of prestressing.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will be able to identify the difference between pre-tensioned and post-tensioned concrete.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will be familiar with the methods and practices of girder fabrication and the methods used to lower tensile stresses.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will have an understanding of the properties of the basic materials used for prestressed concrete.

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Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 2) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  1. As a result of completing this course participants will be able to identify the advantages of prestressed concrete based on an axial stress example
  2. As a result of completing this course participants will be to identify the advantages of prestressed concrete based on a bending stress example
  3. As a result of completing this course participants will be to calculate the stress in concrete due to prestressing
  4. As a result of completing this course participants will be to calculate the stess in prestressing steel

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ACI 318-14 Reorganization - Session Two

The webinar series will present a review of the reorganization of ACI 318 in the 2014 edition applied to precast/prestressed concrete. The webinar will be presented in three parts. Part 1 will be a review of the organization of the code as a component-based document. Part 2 will cover technical changes made to ACI 318 that have effects on the design of precast/prestressed concrete. Part 3 will cover design examples of a prestressed concrete beam, a precast concrete wall, and a precast concrete column to illustrate the flow through the re-organized code applied to precast concrete components. 
 
Module Two
ACI 318-14 Technical Changes from ACI 318-11
 
After attending this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. discuss the technical changes due to added chapters in ACI 318-14
  2. identify additional technical changes that affect the design of precast and prestressed concrete
  3. discuss changes in durability requirements for concrete
  4. discuss technical changes made to seismic provisions of ACI 318-14

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Precast Concrete Mix Design Session Two

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences. PROPORTIONING – A walk through of the ACI-211 method of absolute volume mix design, and a session of designing concrete, using a provided worksheet, from historical data. A mix design Excel spreadsheet, designed for this course, will also be provided. Learning Objectives: 1. Complete the mathematics to proportion a basic mix design 2. Understand the concept of absolute volume mix designs as per ACI-211 3. Design a structural precast concrete mixture 4. Adjust portions of a concrete mix design while maintaining proper yield Part Three: Durability / SCC

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PCI eLearning Course T115: Materials and Manufacturing of Precast, Prestressed Concrete

This second course on design explores the constraints related to type, size, and method selection. Materials control strength and durability characteristics. The industries’ manufacturing capabilities are important conditions on design assumptions. Plant handling and transportation constraints need to be considered in design. This course presents the important initial information required before beginning design, enabling designers to take advantage of the flexibility and economy of precast, prestressed concrete products while avoiding pitfalls that could make solutions less cost effective.
 
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize new and traditional construction materials and their differences
  • Differentiate among fabrication methods
  • Identify devices and mechanisms used to precast members
  • Describe aspects of the design that affect the production of precast members
  • Recall product handling and shipping constraints, as well as transportation methods, that must be considered during design
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PCI eLearning Courses T100: Courses on Design and Fabrication of Precast, Prestressed Concrete Bridge Beams

These courses grew from the need for readily accessible, authoritative educational resources. PCI, with assistance provided by the Federal Highway Administration and in collaboration with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, enlisted a large team of educational course developers, all with practical experience in the design of bridges, many have conducted university research, and most have National Cooperative Highway Research Program development experience. These courses were written by authors who are experts in design. Teams of subject matter experts reviewed and critiqued each course. The courses were then balloted and approved by the PCI Committee on Bridges and the PCI Technical Activities Council. The courses provide the overarching theory, the concise design steps, and information about various issues that will be encountered during design and fabrication of precast, prestressed concrete flexural bridge members.

On the PCI eLearning portal, course participants are able to download reference materials in pdf format to build a library of cited and relevant publications.

At random locations in each course, short quizzes will appear to be sure concepts are being understood. Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and Professional Development Hours (PDHs) are available for compliance with state requirements for registered professional engineers. The credits are accepted in every state. After successful completion of the course, a simple application is all that is required. There is no cost.

more...

PCI eLearning Course T120: Design Loads and Load Distribution

This third course on bridge design teaches one of the fundamental tasks of collecting information on permanent and transient loads that may act on a bridge and how these forces are distributed to the structural components. It presents the load types and load distribution provisions of the LRFD Specifications related to superstructure systems.
 
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize definitions of basic load types
  • Select appropriate load factors to use for load combinations
  • Explain the meaning of distribution factors and choose the appropriate equation to use for a bridge cross section
  • Apply distribution factor equations to a bridge cross section with skew
  • Identify the effects of obtuse corners on exterior girders
  • Examine cases to determine if the Approximate Method applies
  • Identify the types of analyses that can be done for bridges where approximate live-load distribution factors should not be used
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PCI eLearning Courses T100: Courses on Design and Fabrication of Precast, Prestressed Concrete Bridge Beams

These courses grew from the need for readily accessible, authoritative educational resources. PCI, with assistance provided by the Federal Highway Administration and in collaboration with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, enlisted a large team of educational course developers, all with practical experience in the design of bridges, many have conducted university research, and most have National Cooperative Highway Research Program development experience. These courses were written by authors who are experts in design. Teams of subject matter experts reviewed and critiqued each course. The courses were then balloted and approved by the PCI Committee on Bridges and the PCI Technical Activities Council. The courses provide the overarching theory, the concise design steps, and information about various issues that will be encountered during design and fabrication of precast, prestressed concrete flexural bridge members.

On the PCI eLearning portal, course participants are able to download reference materials in pdf format to build a library of cited and relevant publications.

At random locations in each course, short quizzes will appear to be sure concepts are being understood. Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and Professional Development Hours (PDHs) are available for compliance with state requirements for registered professional engineers. The credits are accepted in every state. After successful completion of the course, a simple application is all that is required. There is no cost.

more...

Precast Concrete Mix Design Session Three

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences. DURABILITY / SCC – A discussion of materials and proportioning considerations for designing durable concrete. This session on Self-Consolidating Concrete moves past the basics and gives practical suggestions on making consistent SCC repeatedly. Learning Objectives: 1. Learn common proportioning and materials considerations for durable concrete 2. Identify best practices for mitigating Alikali-Silica Reaction and other long-term issues 3. Design considerations for Self-Consolidating Concrete 4. How the concept of combined aggregate gradation fits into SCC mix design

more...

ACI 318-14 Reorganization Session Three

The webinar series will present a review of the reorganization of ACI 318 in the 2014 edition applied to precast/prestressed concrete. The webinar will be presented in three parts. Part 1 will be a review of the organization of the code as a component-based document. Part 2 will cover technical changes made to ACI 318 that have effects on the design of precast/prestressed concrete. Part 3 will cover design examples of a prestressed concrete beam, a precast concrete wall, and a precast concrete column to illustrate the flow through the re-organized code applied to precast concrete components.  

Module Three
Practical review of Precast Concrete Design through examples using ACI 318-14
               Example precast/prestressed concrete beam
               Examples of precast concrete column and wall
 
After attending this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. perform precast beam design following the new ACI 318-14 format in Chapter 9 with reference to toolbox chapters
  2. perform precast concrete column design following ACI 318-14 Chapter 10
  3. perform precast concrete wall designs following ACI 318-14 Chapter 11  

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Basic Prestressed Concrete Design (Part 3) (1.5 LU or 1.5 PDH)

This course explains the basic concepts and methods of prestressed concrete design. Attendees will work through the design of a simple prestressed concrete rectangular beam of a building. Both straight strand and harped-strand design will be covered in the example, exposing participants to realistic design conditions. The course is based on AC 318-14, ASCE-7 (2010), and IBC (2015).

  1. As a result of completing this course participants will be to design the pretensioned interior of a simple structural system
  2. As a result of completing this course participants will be to define and calculate a tributary live load
  3. As a result of completing this course participants will be to check ultimate and service load conditions
  4. As a result of completing this course participants will be to reference the PCI Design Handbook for prestressed designing

more...

Precast Concrete Mix Design Session Four

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences. ARCHITECTURAL / STATISTICS – We revisit both materials and proportioning, but this time with a view to concrete aesthetics. Best practices are presented for designing the mix and the sample approval process. Also, this session covers the basic statistical processes needed to evaluate the performance of concrete mixtures. Learning Objectives: Part Four: Architectural / Statistics 1. Design an architectural precast concrete mixture 2. Identify best practices for colored and textured concrete 3. Learn the basic statistical concepts pertaining to concrete mix design identified in ACI 318 4. Evaluate the standard deviation of a mixture's 28 day strength

more...

PCI eLearning Course T210: Introduction on Full-Depth Panel Precast Concrete Deck System and its Advantages

This first course is an introduction to full-depth deck panel systems, the advantages to using them, and methods of installation and connection. The course explains first generation concepts and recent details and components, introduces the necessary advanced design topics, and briefly shows applications in four existing bridges.
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the terminology used in the bridge community for designing and applying these panels
  • Explain the benefits of the system
  • Recognize and understand the various types of connections needed between panels and to supporting beams
  • Appreciate full composite interface shear issues
  • Describe longitudinal post-tensioning systems and transverse pretensioning in the decks
  • Identify the applications of panels in four diverse projects

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PCI eLearning Course T215: Design and Detailing of Full-Depth Precast Concrete Deck Panels

The second course on full-depth precast concrete bridge decks describes differences in design from conventional cast-in-place concrete decks. It focuses on detailed design issues and methods and specific details for making connections to supporting girders and between adjacent panels.
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Find requirements for thickness of panels in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications
  • Perform design of panels transverse to the direction of traffic
  • Understand methods to connect panels together longitudinally in the direction of traffic
  • Recognize the design requirements for crash loading on traffic railing attached to the deck overhang
  • Perform design of the composite horizontal shear connection between the panel and girder

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Precast Concrete Mix Design Session Five

Good control of concrete mix design is crucial to producing quality-precast structures. It is important for precast industry professionals; production facility technical personnel, design consultants and department of transportation materials departments have an understanding of concrete mix design. This course is intended to train someone with a basic understanding of concrete so that they can create a concrete mix design meeting their company’s needs, or to evaluate the suitability of a mix for specific applications. This course is specific to needs of the Precast / Prestressed Concrete industry. In this webinar series we will explore the mathematics and chemistry behind creating an absolute volume mix design, and how the proper raw materials, sequencing, and production processes can yield high quality concrete consistently. Also, we will troubleshoot common mistakes in typical precast mix designs and how to avoid them, as well as adjust concrete mixes to compensate for negative external influences. TROUBLE SHOOTING – The concrete we design may exhibit performance issues at times, this session teaches how to identify the cause of several common problems, and what the solutions are. Learning Objectives: Part Five: Trouble Shooting 1. Troubleshoot plastic concrete issues 2. Troubleshoot hardened concrete issues 3. Match solutions to common concrete problems that are identified 4. Learn best practices for handling chemical admixtures in a precast facility

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PCI eLearning Course T220: Production and Construction Details of Full-Depth Precast Concrete Deck Panels

This third course in the full-depth precast concrete bridge deck series, presents an understanding of the processes necessary for the manufacture and handling of precast concrete deck panels. These topics are more than just helpful in considering the adaptation of panels to a particular project. Insights into plant capabilities open up the designer’s awareness to possibilities. In the field, lifting and installation procedures help the designer anticipate specific issues. This course assists the designer in considering options to apply as well as possible limitations to avoid. The issues are readily put into context through ample photographs showing plant production and field installations on bridges.
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify many of the basic steps in the production of precast concrete deck panels
  • Recognize the placement of pretensioning strands and post-tensioning ducts
  • Understand challenges in handling and shipping panels
  • Understand how girder surfaces are prepared for panel installation
  • Recognize how panel elevations are adjusted to desired grade
  • Understand how shear pockets and joints are grouted and the requirements for the grout
  • Recognize the properties of ultra-high-performance concrete
  • Converse about the requirements and types of deck overlays
  • Refer to two design guides and sample specifications

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PCI eLearning Course T225: Case Studies and Emerging Developments of Full-Depth Precast Concrete Deck Panels

The first three courses in this four-course series acquainted the student with the fundamentals necessary to appreciate the advantages and potential applications of precast concrete full-depth deck systems. However, because there is such an enormous combination of variables in the design of bridges with respect to geometry, geographic location, and construction urgency, to name a few, there can be no universal recommendations for how to utilize precast concrete decks. Given the versatility of plant produced products, the designer has considerable latitude in fitting the system to the project. A study of diverse applications in existing bridges expands the student’s imagination in solving new design challenges.
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Appreciate the application of full-depth deck panel systems in five diverse bridges. Using these case studies, understand the following details of the deck systems:
    • Panel-to-panel connections
    • Panel-to-girder connections
    • Traffic barrier-to-deck connections
    • Longitudinal panel joints-connections allowing staged construction
    • Details of particular interest
  • Identify several unique variations of methods and applications that continue to emerge

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PCI eLearning Course T310: Extending Spans

The majority of bridges in the U.S. are built with precast, prestressed concrete. Excellent durability and structural performance over the long term and low cost in the short term have encouraged owners and designers to find methods to extend the span ranges of typical girder shapes and to develop new shapes to satisfy more applications. Many methods to accomplish longer spans have been developed. Many of these are becoming almost commonplace today. A brief history of traditional span ranges is reviewed as are the many benefits of longer-span applications. Methods and materials resulting in longer spans is discussed as are their implications for fabrication and construction.
 
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Recall reasons for historical span limitations
  • Recognize the benefits of longer spans
  • Recognize advancements that have allowed span lengths to increase dramatically
  • Identify methods being used to build long bridge spans with precast concrete
  • Examine the significance of common methods used to extend spans
  • Recognize the implications for fabrication and construction when employing these methods

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How Precast Builds (Precast/Prestressed Concrete 101) (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Explore building design solutions using precast/prestressed concrete products. Learn what precast/prestressed concrete products are, how they are manufactured, including structural theory of prestressing, and quality assurance procedures. Learn about the industry certification program (PCI) of plants, people and performance. The introduction will explore numerous examples of architectural and structural concrete solutions. Learn about the industry certification program (PCI) of plants, people and performance. The introduction will explore numerous examples of architectural and structural concrete solutions

  • As a result of completing this course participants will become familiar with structural (HSW) and architectural precast concrete applications.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will understand the sustainable (HSW), maintenance, and other benefits of precast concrete.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will discover architectural and structural precast solutions for common design challenges.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will be able to describe how precast concrete contributes to design versatility, energy efficiency, and long-term building performance. (HSW)

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Innovative Mixed-Use Buildings with Parking (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Join us for a discussion about parking design and ways to integrate precast components into a parking garage. How do designers create these spaces and what materials are typically used? How are innovative precast systems being adapted for these developments? The presenter will discuss the overall collaboration needed by the team to enhance project success.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how these new mixed-use buildings are changing the surrounding communities in an urban center
  • Understand how the generation trends will affect the design of future parking structures and mixed use facilities
  • Discover how building codes are dictating that our structures need to be more resilient to withstand natural disasters
  • Recognize the shift in design of precast concrete parking structures, which have evolved over time from gray rectangles to iconic landmarks 

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Engineered Utility Precast Solutions (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

This webinar will be an introduction to Engineered Utility precast concrete products and applications. An emphasis will be placed on cost/labor/time savings, quality, and the versatility of utility precast applications. Attendees will be educated on innovative precast solutions in markets ranging from heavy civil, transportation, energy, wastewater, site development, residential and industrial. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the options that Utility precast can provide.
  • Gain a clear grasp of the design and manufacturing parameters for a wide variety of precast solutions. 
  • Become familiar with how to benefit from using precast in lieu of cast in place (through emulative dealing).
  • Be able to cite specific case studies in which Utility precast was selected.

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Material Selection Matters (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Construction professionals specify materials every day; your decisions affect the environment, our communities, and their health and safety. Harnessing the evolving body of knowledge about the impacts of materials on our communities is integral to improving the science and art of architecture and engineering. It is crucial to have transparent, accurate information about building materials in order to select the products that are right for your project.
“Building failures are the most common cause of missed energy targets, durability issues, and health and comfort problems. Making multilayered, high-performance structures and building envelopes function as they should requires a new way of thinking that has not yet become second nature in the industry” John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng. – Principal, RDH Building Science

Learning Objectives:
  • Applications for wood and precast concrete structural and enclosure systems
  • State-of-the-art expertise on choosing the right material for the project
  • Applying building science principles to construct resilient, durable, long-lasting, healthy and energy-efficient buildings
  • Understand how the evolving body of knowledge impacts materials selection to enable you to select the products that are right for your projects and your communities                
Presenters:
John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., Principal, RDH Building Science 
Alex Lukachko, Senior Associate, RDH Building Science 

more...

The Case for Resilient Design (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Resiliency is a national priority. The AEC community will play an important role by driving acceptance and implementation of resilient based design. This course addresses the question of how best to quantify and communicate resilient based design. It reviews the risk assessment standards in FEMA P-58 and presents the U.S. Resiliency Council's established standard rating system designed to describe the performance of buildings during earthquakes and other natural hazard events.

  • As a result of completing this course participants will understand Community Resilience and importance of ability to recover.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will be able define resilient design and learn how it is related to sustainable design.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will value the distinction between building to code and designing for resilience.
  • As a result of completing this course participants will understand the U.S. Resiliency Council and the value of standard rating system that communicates useful performance metrics.

more...

Efficient Design Assist - Precast Concrete Case Studies (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

What does design build really mean? How does it work for precast? Designers are teaming with precast concrete industry partners who offer design influence, engineering assistance, cost controls, accelerated occupancy, and construction efficiencies. As precasters are getting more involved in projects, owners, designers, and construction managers are turning to them for innovative solutions. We will feature case studies of iconic structures and define the precaster's role in making projects successful. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of adding precasters to the team earlier in the construction process.
  • Learn the best way to utilize a precaster to assist the project delivery team.
  • Recognize the importance of contracting with team members to ensure that risk is assigned to the proper party.
  • Learn how evolving design roles are shaping the future of the precast concrete industry. 

more...

Total Precast Concrete K-12 School Case Studies (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

This presentation offers a detailed discussion of new innovations being used today to deliver thermally efficient, total precast concrete K-12 schools. The presentation uses case studies to demonstrate the sustainability and resilience aspects of the total precast systems. Examples of significant cost savings, energy savings, reduced site disturbance and truncated construction schedules will be illustrated. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding total precast concrete building systems in K-12 schools using load-bearing insulated wall panels and double tee floors/roof.
  • Examine, by case studies of completed K-12 schools, system design, detailing, aesthetic possibilities and life-cycle costs reductions.
  • Demonstrate potential energy savings and construction costs savings through the use of total precast concrete insulated enclosures.
  • Explain sustainability and resilience aspects of precast concrete and how the system can help meet increasing energy code requirements.

more...

Precast Concrete Off-Site Construction: Techniques & Case Studies (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

​The National Institute of Building Sciences 2014 Off-Site Construction Industry Survey found precast concrete structural components were the most often used elements of off-site construction.  With the looming shortage of skilled workers forecast to exceed 2 million by 2017, prefabrication may become a necessity and a more common method of project delivery.  The benefits include shorter construction schedules, greater degree of predictability in cost, reduced material waste, reduced coordination of trades and reduced risk.   This session will provide an overview of the most common systems of precast concrete products, cover basic design criteria and capabilities, and explore case studies showing how precast was used to solve diverse design and construction challenges with off-site construction.

  • As a result of completing this course, participant will understand precast concrete products and buildings systems.
  • As a result of completing this course, participant will be able to discussing the planning, design, coordination, fabrication and installation process with precast.
  • As a result of completing this course, participant will be able to review mini-case studies illustrating off-site construction concepts.
  • As a result of completing this course, participant will learn about precast specifications, design resources, and the PCI plant certification program and be able to discuss the importance of resilient building design concepts.

more...

Energy (Fenestration) [DN-15b] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

This course will enable attendees to understand the three main components of windows; glazing, spacer and frame.  Participants will take away knowledge of how to incorporate passive solar techniques and use thermal mass such as that in precast concrete to absorb solar heat gain.  Additionally, types of window systems and how to gain maximum efficiency based on codes such as ASHRAE 90.1 will be discussed.  

Objectives:
Discover the components of a fenestration system.
Understand the U-factors for various fenestration products.
Develop a deeper understanding of the role of emittance values and air-space gases on the thermal performance of windows.
Learn how to choose the correct fenestration system for the climate zone in which a project is located.

more...

The use of EPD'S and the Role of Transparency in Sustainable Development (1 HSW/LU or 1 PDH)

Environmental product declarations (EPDs) are the latest trend in sustainability reporting by manufacturers.  Leading-edge industries in the construction materials sector are on board – they’re using EPDs to understand and transparently communicate the environmental footprint of their products.  In this webinar, learn more about EPDs and how they can help earn points in LEED v4

Learning objectives – following this webinar, participants will:

  1. Understand the purpose and content of an EPD
  2. Understand the value of LCA in sustainability
  3. Be able to earn LEED points for EPDs
  4. Recognize the effort required by manufacturers to produce an EPD

more...

Terra-Cotta Faced Precast Concrete (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Terra cotta tiles have been used to clad buildings in the United States for several decades, providing a distinctive aesthetic touch. Today, designers are discovering they can embed terra cotta into architectural and structural precast concrete panels as a means to more efficiently use terra cotta on projects.

After reading this article, readers will be able to:
1. Describe the design considerations for the application of terra cotta on precast concrete.
2. Explain how terra cotta is used in precast concrete.
3. Describe the benefits of using terra cotta-faced precast concrete.
4. Explain the specification and requirements when using terra cotta with precast concrete

more...

Designing for Fire Safety (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Fire safety codes have changed over the years. The International Building Code now allows for buildings to be built to substantially bigger areas and heights with Type V construction (i.e. light wood framing) where an approved sprinkler system is provided. This shift toward active fire protection systems places a primary emphasis on the life safety component for buildings, and decreases emphasis on containment and passive fire-resistant construction for property protection and safety to fire service. The net result is less resilient construction. Buildings, especially light frame, relying solely on code-approved sprinklers for protection leave themselves vulnerable to damage from fires where the sprinkler systems fails to control the fire. Precast concrete provides significantly enhanced passive fire protection due to its inherent inorganic composition and resistance to the effects of fire. Containment by compartmentalizing the design with a precast concrete structural system limits damage and may allow occupants more time to evacuate the premises. PCI recently published its updated fire manual including an International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) report that allows its use as an alternate to code provisions. This presentation will provide an overview of fire safety design using the updated manual.

more...

High Performance Athletic Facilities (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

Health awareness and athletic competition have become increasingly more important throughout the past years. We see expansions of professional sports teams, new extreme sports being introduced, old facilities being rebuilt, and a growing demand for new facilities. For example, the athletic facility market is expected to grow by 15% or more over next couple of years. Furthermore, these structures have increasing requirements to design and built for high performance and provide flexibility, functionality, and durability. This presentation will provide an overview of today's high performance athletic facility design using precast concrete systems, as well as include recommendations to optimize designs. Topics discussed will be highlighted with case studies.

more...

High Performance Essentials: Energy Modeling & Envelope Commissioning (1 PDH or 1 LU/HSW)

To design and build high performance buildings we must have reliable approaches to energy modeling to predict future performance and guide design decisions. High performance buildings must also actually perform. Hence, building commissioning is becoming more important in order to confirm construction and performance. This presentation will discuss what energy modeling and envelope commissioning are and their role in construction. 

more...

Designing High Performance Precast Concrete Parking Structures (1 HSW/LU or 1 PDH)

Parking structures have changed a lot over the past decade. Today’s parking structures have to be built sustainably, reduce operational and maintenance costs, last longer, and have more stringent aesthetic requirements. In many cases, they have to be high performance structures exceeding standard expectations. This presentation will explain what a high performance parking structure is, as well as how to design and build them utilizing high performance precast concrete. The latest innovations and design methodologies, including connections, proper detailing, and maintenance will be discussed. As a result of completing this course participant will be able to describe the primary attributes of a high performance (HSW) parking structure. As a result of completing this course participants will be able to discuss the latest HSW innovations in parking structure design. As a result of completing this course participants will be able to explain the differences in various structural (HSW) systems for parking structures. As a result of completing this course participants will be able to describe proper maintenance procedures for parking structures.

more...

Energy Conservation & Condensation Control [DN-15] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

Americans spend 90% of their time inside buildings which means the designers need to know how their envelope systems work to control energy & moisture. Several factors influence the actual energy performance of a building envelope so will use this time to discuss not only precast envelope systems but various wall systems both as rain barriers and rain screens.

This 2016 update of the Designer's Notebook #15 offers 1 HSW/LU (or 1 PDH).
After reading this article, readers will be able to:

1. Discover how to control energy and manage moisture in an envelope system.
2. Understand the various codes that are applicable for wall systems.
3. Develop a deeper understanding of the insulation systems for walls and R-values and U-factors.
4. How to create an air barrier system within one building envelope system.

more...

Artist's Palette: The Aesthetic Versatility of Precast Concrete (1 PDH or 1 LU)

The aesthetics of a structure are very important, as it is what most people identify with. High performance materials should provide aesthetic versatility in order to efficiently meet a structure's architectural requirements. Precast concrete provides incredible aesthetic versatility from providing multiple colors and textures, to developing shapes, forms and very ornate details. Precast can also simulate or be veneered with natural materials providing all of their beauty, but with the added speed, durability, many other benefits of precast. This presentation will provide an overview of the many finishes available with precast concrete, along with methodologies for achieving them. We will also discuss combining multiple finishes into single panels, veneers and embedded materials, selection of mix designs, approaches to achieving colors, proper specification, and procedures to ensure expectations are aligned.

  1. After completing this course, participants will be able to explain the finish options of precast concrete.
  2. After completing this course, participants will be able to describe methods to achieve color, form and texture.
  3. After completing this course, participants will be able to explain how clay products and natural stones can be veneered to precast concrete to speed construction and reduce costs.
  4. After completing this course, participants will be able to discuss the latest innovations in aesthetics and finishes.

more...

Connections [DN-32] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

This Designer's Notebook provides an overview of the design concepts for connections of architectural precast concrete enclosure systems. This includes the types of connections and hardware as well as design considerations, such as fireproofing. The articles also addresses who is typically responsible for supplying field hardware.

  1. After attending this course attendees will be able to describe the various connection hardware and materials used for precast concrete enclosures.
  2. After attending this course attendees will be able to explain the considerations necessary to design connections properly.
  3. After attending this course attendees will be able to explain who has responsibility for supplying field hardware to be placed on or in a structure.
  4. After attending this course attendees will be able to define the different categories of connections.

more...

Fire Resistance of Architectural Precast Concrete Envelopes [DN-31] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

In the interest of life safety and property protection, building codes require that resistance to fire be considered in the design of buildings. The degree of fire resistance required depends on the type of occupancy, the size of the building, its location (proximity to property lines and within established fire zones), and in some cases, the amount and type of fire detection and extinguishing equipment available in the structure. Precast concrete members are inherently noncombustible and can be designed to meet any degree of fire resistance that may be required by building codes, insurance companies, and other authorities.

more...

Building Envelope Commissioning [DN-30] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

Standard Practice for Building Enclosure Commissioning.

4. Discuss the relevance of BECx to the project delivery process, rolls and responsibilties of the project team, and verification of

quantifiable building performance.

Building Enclosure Commissioning (BECx) is a holistic process developed with input from stakeholders in the real estate development, design, construction, and property management communities to supplement and strengthen the project delivery process and deliver higher performing buildings and structures. BECx was originally conceived as par t of a more broadly based whole-building Commissioning (Cx) program that began largely as a test-and-balance activity in the HVAC industry but today has evolved to include a wide range of processes intended to ensure fully integrated and

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the history and development of Building Enclosure Commissioning (BECx).

2. Describe the BECx process.

3. Explain the requirements for BECx in ASTM E2813,

more...

Sustainability [DN 33] (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

This article provides a broad introduction to the topic of sustainability, as well as in-depth information on topics such as integrated design, life-cycle assessment, concrete-industry-related life-cycle inventory data, green building rating systems, and much more. After an introduction to these topics, sustainable-design strategies related to the use of precast concrete are outlined. Broad topics such as environmental protection and resiliency are also include.

  1. After this read, and passing the quiz, participants will be able to better understand broad sustainability-related (HSW) topics.
  2. Readers will be able to explain concepts of integrated design, life-cycle assessment, and resiliency. (HSW)
  3. Readers will be able to discuss the different green building codes, standards, and rating systems that are in the market. (HSW)
  4. Readers will be able to describe how precast concrete can be used to design and build more-sustainable buildings. (HSW)

more...

Form Liners [DN-34] (1 PDH or 1 LU)

This article provides a broad introduction to the topic of sustainability, as well as in-depth information on topics such as integrated design, life-cycle assessment, concrete-industry-related life-cycle inventory data, green building rating systems, and much more. After an introduction to these topics, sustainable-design strategies related to the use of precast concrete are outlined. Broad topics such as environmental protection and resiliency are also included.

  1. As a result of completing this course participant will be able to explain the form liner options for precast concrete surfaces.
  2. As a result of completing this course participant will be able to discuss the applications of computer numerical control (CNC) for the production of custom designed form liners.
  3. As a result of completing this course participant will be able to explain the process for the application of photographic concrete.
  4. As a result of completing this course participant will be able to describe the process for the use of lettering on precast concrete.

more...

Weathering [DN-29] (1 PDH)

A primary consideration in the architectural design of buildings is weathering, or how the appearance changes as a result of exposure to atmospheric and environmental conditions. Weathering can have a dramatic effect on the original building appearance, distorting the designer’s original design concept. This article discusses how to predict weathering, and take it into account during design. There are many things designers can do to counteract the negative effects of weathering such as the design of shapes, textures, and details. The article also discusses sealers and even how to make self-cleaning concrete.

more...

Design and Construction Responsibilities for Architectural Precast Concrete [DN-28] (2 PDH or 2 LU)

Design and construction with architectural precast concrete are simplified when all parties are working as cooperative partners. Clearly defining the scope of work and the responsibilities of the involved parties by means of the contract documents is critical to achieving a high-quality structure. This article provides a guide for all parties involved in a precast concrete project and defines the responsibilities of each party. These responsibilities and relationships between the parties should be defined in the contract documents for a particular project. This course will offer 2.0 continuing education units.

more...

Discover High Performance Precast (1 PDH or 1 HSW/LU)

Recent code changes, increasing sustainability requirements, and a challenging economy are just some of the factors increasing demand for high-performance structures. High performance is not business-as-usual. The concept of high-performance encompasses sustainability; however, it goes beyond a ‘this-or-that’ approach by requiring optimization of all relevant attributes for a project on a life cycle basis. This presentation will explain what high performance structures are, and how precast concrete can help you achieve your high performance project goals.

After attending this course attendees will

  1. Understand what High Performance structures are
  2. Be able to explain the difference between sustainability and high performance
  3. Be able to explain the concept of resiliency and how high performance design incorporates it to provide multi-hazard protection
  4. Describe how precast concrete contributes to design versatility, energy efficiency, and long-term building performance

This course is registered with AIA to offer HSW credit.

more...

Design Factors Affecting Aesthetics of Architectural Precast Concrete [DN-27] (2 PDH or 2 HSW/LU)

In today’s world of design, projects need to able to stand out or sometimes blend in, as well as everything in between.  Exterior building facades must be sustainable, durable, energy efficient, and yet versatile enough to allow designers to meet their aesthetic requirements and desires.  This article discusses how precast concrete’s aesthetic versatility can help you achieve your aesthetic design goals.  It provides an overview of finishes, how to achieve them and when best to use them based on project location, environmental factors, and needs. The article also discusses combination finishes, veneers of natural materials, and self-cleaning facades.  This course will offer 2.0 continuing education units.

more...

Designing High Performance Precast Concrete Parking Structures (1 HSW/LU or 1 PDH)

Parking structures have changed a lot over the past decade. Today’s parking structures have to be built sustainably, reduce operational and maintenance costs, last longer, and have more stringent aesthetic requirements. In many cases, they have to be high performance structures exceeding standard expectations. This presentation will explain what a high performance parking structure is, as well as how to design and build them utilizing high performance precast concrete. The latest innovations and design methodologies, including connections, proper detailing, and maintenance will be discussed.

As a result of completing this course participant will be able to describe the primary attributes of a high performance (HSW) parking structure.

As a result of completing this course participants will be able to discuss the latest HSW innovations in parking structure design.

As a result of completing this course participants will be able to explain the differences in various structural (HSW) systems for parking structures.

As a result of completing this course participants will be able to describe proper maintenance procedures for parking structures. 

more...

Technical Writing Part 1 (1 PDH)

The first session on technical writing gives an overview of technical writing.  Whether you’re writing a paper for publication, a memo to your boss, or a report to your client, the basic principles of technical writing apply.  We’ll discuss what technical writing is and how it is and is not like other types of writing.  We’ll cover ways to approach the daunting task of staring at the blank screen and filling it with meaningful prose.  We’ll discuss writing style as it pertains to technical writing.  We’ll examine the basic elements of all technical reports and briefly discuss the other elements that may appear.  Lastly, we’ll talk about some ethical and legal considerations as they pertain to technical writing.

After attending this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand what technical writing is and what makes it different from other kinds of writing.
  • Know what questions to ask yourself to decide how best to get your ideas across to your readers.
  • Convey ten logical ways to organize a technical report – and one psychological way.
  • Understand some ethical and legal considerations that pertain to writing and publishing.

more...

Technical Writing Part 2 (1.5 PDH)

After attending this course participants will be able to:

Recognize the parallels between the scientific method and the basic structure of any technical report.

Understand the purpose and content of each section of a technical report.

Apply methods on how to avoid some common errors in writing.

Try their hand at editing some real-life “don’t let this happen to you” examples.

more...
 

About PCI

The Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) was established to foster greater understanding and use of precast and prestressed concrete products.  PCI is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, maintains a full staff of technical, marketing and education specialists, and has organization and individual members all over the world.


At any time, if you have any questions about PCI you can click on our logo at the top of the page to visit our website, or visit us at http://www.pci.org

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Program Goals

The goal of this distance learning program is to provide quality education on precast and prestressed concrete topics to:



  • Increase awareness of the benefits of precast/prestressed concrete

  • Develop interest in designing and building with precast/prestressed concrete

  • Foster an increased understanding of precast concrete as a building material and system

  • Develop relationships with target influencers and decision makers

  • Position PCI as a leading education resource for the precast concrete structures industry


If you have any comments or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact the PCI Education Department at (312) 360-3219.

More Information

For more information about this site, about precast/prestressed concrete products, or about PCI, please visit our website at www.pci.org or call us at (312) 786-0300.

About This Site

The PCI eLearning Center is the result of feedback from attendees just like you. Although local face-to-face (f2f) learning environments are close to home and inexpensive, busy professionals know that your schedule may not allow you to attend at a set time. You’ve consistently asked for recorded versions of our courses in order to meet your locality’s continuing education requirements with the top-quality programming for which PCI is well known. You want on-demand distance education taught by renowned industry professionals covering precast/prestressed concrete topics ... and we listened!

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Continuing Education Credits

PCI is an approved education provider with the following organizations:



National Council of Examiners of Engineers and Surveyors (NCEES): All courses offered through this site are approved to grant Professional Development Hours (PDH) at a 1:1 ratio, or 1 PDH for every hour of instruction.



 



American Institute of Architects (AIA): Courses offered through this site may be approved to grant Learning Units (LU) at a 1:1 ratio, or 1 LU for every hour of instruction. Be sure to verify a course's approved status in the course description.  AIA members must provide their AIA numbers when registering for a course in order to obtain credit.



 U.S. Green Building Council (USBGC): A limited number of courses may offer GBCI CE credit, earned at a 1:1 ratio, or 1 GCBI CE for every hour of instruction. Be sure to verify a course's approved status in the course description.



Florida Board of Professional Engineers (FBPE): All courses offered through this site are approved to grant professional development Hours (PDH) at a 1:1 ratio, or 1 PDH per hour of instruction to all professional engineers registered in the state of Florida.  

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Sponsors

The PCI eLearning Center would would not be possible without the generosity of our sponsors.  PCI would like to thank:



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